Threesology Research Journal
Language Threes
page F


~ The Study of Threes ~
http://threesology.org



Christopher Priest (1K) Christopher Priest:

Every great magic trick consists of three parts or acts.


  1. The first part is called "The Pledge". The magician shows you something ordinary: a deck of cards, a bird or a man. He shows you this object. Perhaps he asks you to inspect it to see if it is indeed real, unaltered, normal. But of course... it probably isn't.

  2. The second act is called "The Turn". The magician takes the ordinary something and makes it do something extraordinary. Now you're looking for the secret... but you won't find it, because of course you're not really looking. You don't really want to know. You want to be fooled. But you wouldn't clap yet. Because making something disappear isn't enough; you have to bring it back.

  3. That's why every magic trick has a third act, the hardest part, the part we call "The Prestige".


Christopher Priest,
The Prestige



“To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funny bone.”
(Reba McEntire: actress, singer)


Shiver me timbers: Expression of the Popeye cartoon character?


It's The Law! (As a reminder to do or not to do something.)


Bagged and Tagged: expression heard on some crime/criminal/law/court related television shows that refers to the disposition of a corpse at a crime scene. In other words, the person is sometimes placed into a zippered plastic-like bag and identified with a name. If no identification is found, they are labeled as either a Jane Doe or John Doe.


In the television series "Warehouse 13" (which contains themes from the X-files, Librarian and other television shows), the three-patterned expression of "Snag it, Bag it and Tag it" is heard. The expression is directed towards the collection of "unusual artifacts" which produce non-normal effects or events.




3-part expression using four words: I can do it- I can do it- I can do it.


Three common male names (and their derivatives) associated with various activities, items, conditions:


  1. Jack- Jack knife, Jack of all trades, Jack hammer, etc...
  2. Tom- Tom foolery, Tom cat, Tommy gun, etc...
  3. John- Toilet, Johnny come lately, Johnny reb, etc...

Three girl or boy names (and their derivatives) associated with various activities, items, conditions:


  1. Billy (Bill, Will, Wilma, William, etc.)- Billy goat, Billy club, Willy Nilly, etc...
  2. Bobby (Bob, Robert, Robin, Roberta, etc.)- Bobby pin, Bobby (British police officer), Fishing bob, etc...
  3. Terry- Terry cloth, Tarry, (Tory/Tarry- tar and feather?)

(You might want to add to the above list of examples.)




William Durant, founder of General Motors:


  1. "Forget past mistakes.
  2. Forget failures.
  3. Forget everything except what you going to do now and do it."

Grenville Kleiser


  • "There are many fine things which you mean to do some day,
  • under what you think will be more favorable circumstances.
  • But the only time that is yours is the present."

Agatha Christie (1890 - 1976)


  • "I like living.
  • I have sometimes been wildly, despairingly, acutely miserable, racked with sorrow,
  • but through it all I still know quite certainly that just to be alive is a grand thing."

--- Plumbing Store.com ---
http://www.plumbingstore.com/wordsofwisdom.html



3 body- related references sometimes heard in reference to a specific behavior in a particular context that should be attended to as a rule-of-thumb:


  1. Keep your shoulder to the wheel.
  2. Keep your nose to the grindstone (or wind).
  3. Keep your ear to the ground.

3-patterned standard rule-of-thumb for changing oil: Every 3 months or 3,000 miles. (This is nothing more than an advertizement to sell more oil because even though oil may look dirty, it requires an analysis to prove that it actually is. This is why the military tests many of their vehicles for oil contaminates because the cost of oil and related products is out-rageous!)


3 ways to communicate:


  1. Telegraph
  2. Telephone
  3. Tell a woman

3-way decision encountered in the military:


  1. The Right Way.
  2. The Wrong Way.
  3. The Army Way. (or The Navy Way, The Marine Way, The Air Force Way.)

3 characteristic problems encountered by those using a recipe book:


  • The pages will flip.
  • Food spills on the pages.
  • The pages can't be read easily.



3-patterned phrases of Susie Gharib on the (U.S. televised) Nightly Business Report:


Good Evening Everyone.../And Finally Tonight.../

3-patterned phrase of Peter Jennings: Finally This Evening...




3 principal parts of common irregular verbs:
Plain form Past tense Past participle
arise
become
begin
bid
bite
blow
break
bring
burst
buy
catch
choose
come
cut
dive
do
draw
dream
drink
drive
eat
fall
find
flee
fly
forget
freeze
get
give
go
grow
hand (suspend)
hang (execute)
hear
hide
hold
keep
know
lay
lead
leave
let
lie
lose
pay
prove
ride
ring
rise
run
say
see
set
shake
sing
sink
sit
slide
speak
spring
stand
steal
swim
take
tear
throw
wear
write
arose
became
began
bid
bit
blew
broke
brought
burst
bought
caught
chose
came
cut
dived, dove
did
drew
dreamed, dreamt
drank
drove
ate
fell
found
fled
flew
forgot
froze
got
gave
went
grew
hung
hanged
heard
hid
held
kept
knew
laid
led
left
let
lay
lost
paid
proved
rode
rang
rose
ran
said
saw
set
shook
sang, sung
sank, sunk
sat
slid
spoke
sprang, sprung
stood
stole
swam
took
tore
threw
wore
wrote
arisen
become
begun
bid
bitten, bit
blown
broken
brought
burst
bought
caught
chosen
come
cut
dived
done
drawn
dreamed, dreamt
drunk
driven
eaten
fallen
found
fled
flown
forgotten, forgot
frozen
got, gotten
given
gone
grown
hung
hanged
heard
hidden
held
kept
known
laid
led
left
let
lain
lost
paid
proved, proven
ridden
rung
risen
run
said
seen
set
shaken
sung
sunk
sat
slid
spoken
sprung
stood
stolen
swum
taken
torn
thrown
worn
written


List taken from pages 227-229, of The Little, Brown Handbook, fifth edition. H. Ramsey Fowler, Jane E. Aaron, ©1992 by HarperCollins Publishers Inc.
ISBN 0-673-52132-X

In the thirteen year of rule of the second Manchu emperor (Kiang Hsi), a monastery of fighting monks ("Siu Lam") were recruited by the emperor to defeat a rebellion in Fukien. These monasteries received some imperial power as a reward. Due to court jealousies, these Fukien Buddhist monks were then themselves seen as a threat, and an army was sent to suppress them. Eighteen monks escaped, but only 5 survived further, who are thought to have founded 5 monasteries, and five secret societies, dedicated to overthrowing the Manchu (also known as the Ching) dynasty, and restoring the previous Chinese Ming dynasty, which was seen as a golden age for China. Their (2 by 2 three-part) motto became "Crush the Ch'ing, establish the Ming".


--- Gangland.net: Triads ---
http://www.gangland.net/triads.htm



Winston Spencer Churchill:


  1. It is not the end.
  2. It is not even the beginning of the end,
  3. but it may be the end of the beginning.

3 similarly sounding words: Sense- Cents- Scents




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Updated Posting: Wednesday, 19-July-2017... 6:44 AM
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Herb O. Buckland
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